Bird of the Year 2017

BirdLife South Africa has chosen the endangered Lappet-faced Vulture Torgos tracheliotos as the Bird of the Year for 2017 to highlight the numerous threats and challenges faced by all of Africa's vulture species, including poisoning, collisions with and electrocutions on powerlines, as well as drowning in farm reservoirs. BirdLife South Africa and its partners are involved with several conservation initiatives aimed at assisting Africa's declining vulture populations. Lappet-faced Vultures are distributed across the dry savanna habitats of Africa, however, they have been extirpated or become locally extinct across large areas of the continent (Figure 1). The Lappet-faced Vulture is one of the more charismatic vulture species with its large size (wingspan of up to 2.9m), dark back and wings which contrast with its white thighs, a face and throat covered by bare red skin and a heavy set bill. Lappet-faced Vultures use their strong bills to tear open carcasses of large mammals and in doing so allow vulture species with smaller beaks access into the rest of the carcass. Vultures play a vital ecological role by consuming carcasses of dead animals, thus assisting in the cycling of nutrients from the dead animal back into the ecosystem and preventing the spread of diseases such as rabies.

fig1

Figure 1. Distribution map of the Lappet-faced Vulture showing
its current distribution in greenand areas where this species
no longer occurs in red (BirdLife International Data Zone).

Previous birds of the year

2016 - Sociable Weaver
2015 - Blue Crane
2014 - Tristan Albatross
2013 - White-winged Flufftail
2012 - African Fish Eagle
2011 - Barn Swallow
2010 - Lesser Flamingo
2009 - Cape Robin-chat
2008 - Spotted Eagle-Owl
2007 - African Penguin

For more information about the Bird of the Year initiative, please email marketing@birdlife.org.za

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1. Distribution map of the Lappet-faced Vulture showing its current distribution in green and areas where this species no longer occurs in red (BirdLife International Data Zone http://datazone.birdlife.org/species/factsheet/22695238).

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